Advisory Committee

Among those who help maintain the interdisciplinary Graduate Liberal Studies program are the faculty -- from the humanities, the social sciences and the physical sciences -- who volunteer their time and talents on our Advisory Committee.   The members of this committee serve the program in a number of ways, such as interviewing candidates, reviewing course proposals, reviewing student master's project proposals, and serving as readers on master's examining committees.  They also help shape the nature and direction of the program by serving as a sounding board for new program plans and initiatives.  The Graduate Liberal Studies program would not be able to function without their dedication.

Music

Thomas Brothers is Professor of Music.  He joined the faculty at Duke in 1991 after completing his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley.  He has published three books on Louis Armstrong, most recently Louis Armstrong, Master of Modernism (W.W. Norton, 2014).  In addition to African American music, Professor Brothers also teaches music of the medieval and renaissance periods.  Currently he is writing a book on The Beatles.

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences; Sociology
Psychology & Neuroscience

Deborah T. Gold is Professor of Medical Sociology in the Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Sociology, and Psychology & Neuroscience at Duke University Medical Center, where she is also a Senior Fellow of the Duke Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. Professor Gold received her B.A. in English and Latin from the University of Illinois, her M.Ed. in Reading from National Louis University, and her Ph.D. in Human Development and Social Policy from Northwestern University. Her primary research interests are in the psychological and social consequences of chronic disease in the elderly.  She has done seminal research on osteoporosis and its impact on quality of life.  She has also studied the psychosocial impact of breast cancer, Parkinson’s disease, syncope, head and neck cancer, Paget’s disease of bone, and dementia in older adults. Her current research examines compliance and persistence with medications for older adults with chronic illnesses.

Divinity School

Amy Laura Hall is Associate Professor of Christian Ethics. She holds her B.A. from Emory (1990), her M.Div. from Yale Divinity School (1993), and her Ph.D. from Yale University (1999). Professor Hall has been on faculty for eighteen years. She has taught for the Focus program in Genomics and in Global Health. She serves on the faculty board for Graduate Liberal Studies and for the NCCU-Duke Program. She organized a 2011 conference against torture and is organizing a 2017 conference on drones in warfare. Her book on Julian of Norwich is forthcoming from Duke University Press.

English

Melissa Malouf is Professor of the Practice of English. She teaches courses in creative writing and (mainly) contemporary literature. She is the author of two novels, More Than You Know and It Had to Be You (Avisson Press, 1997) and a collection of stories, sNo Guarantees (William Morrow, 1990). One of the stories in this collection, "The Golden Robe," was awarded a prestigious Pushcart Prize (1989). Several of her stories have been cited for excellence by both Pushcart and Best American Short Stories; two of them appear in North Carolina anthologies of contemporary literature. She has written three one-act plays, which premiered at Duke, as well as two opera libretti, one of them commissioned by The Durham Arts Council. Dr. Malouf is the recipient of The Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award (1997). She earned her Ph.D. in English and American Literature at the University of California, Irvine. In addition to her roles as a member of Duke's English Department, she works on Selection and Recruitment for the Office of Undergraduate Scholars and Fellows.

Biology

Jonathan Shaw is a Professor in the Department of Biology. He received his Ph.D. in 1983 from the University of Michigan. Dr. Shaw's research is on the systematics, population genetics, and evolution of bryophytes (mosses). Some of his research interests have included the taxonomy and classification of particular groups of mosses, developmental anatomy, and genetic relationships among populations of very rare species. A current focus in the lab is the evolution of peatmosses (Sphagnum) and Dr. Shaw's field work tends to be in polar and high altitude environments. He has published some 200 scientific papers and has edited two books, one on the evolution of tolerance in plants to toxic metals in the environment, and one on the biology of bryophytes. Dr. Shaw taught for eight years at a liberal arts college (Ithaca College) before coming to Duke in 1996.

History

Susan Thorne, Associate Professor of History, teaches courses on the social history of Britain and the British Empire, and on the history of European expansion more generally. She is currently working on Charles Dickens’ influence on Anglo American “ways of seeing” the children of the urban poor.  The Dickensian Affect:  Reckonings with Reform in Early Victorian Southwark (in progress) juxtaposes Dickens’s representation of criminal poverty and urban childhood in his most popular novel, Oliver Twist (1837-8) to archival accounts generated by the poor law’s reform during the 1830s and hungry ‘40s.