Liberal Studies Seminars

Each year, Duke GLS offers a wide array of Liberal Studies (LS) Seminars developed exclusively for its students, including the GLS core course.  Students in the program also can take graduate courses (500-level and higher) from across campus.  For further details about course grades and requirements, see the RegistrationDegree Requirements or Academic Policies pages.  

LS 760-35 - Science in the Public Eye
Fall 2020
Tuesdays, 6:15-8:45 pm
GLS Conference Room
NEW COURSE
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Understanding the role of science in everyday life is a critical aspect of modern society. Science is often discussed through social media, news outlets, and politics without details of the underlying concepts. “Science in the Public Eye” is designed to give all students taking it a broad introduction to fundamental scientific concepts, expose them to the natural world, and make them a more informed citizen. In this course, students will investigate topics that are often discussed through these platforms. We will explore the science behind the topic, popular opinions, and discuss misconceptions. We will focus on topics ranging from vaccinations, disease epidemics, genetically modified organisms, and antibiotic resistance to the Endangered Species Act and climate change. Our main goal through our classroom discussions will be to focus on effective communication of the topic. 

Each week we will read and discuss scientific and nonscientific readings on the assigned topic. We will compare and contrast the readings and discuss misconceptions that the general public might get from only reading nonscientific articles. Students will work individually or in pairs to lead one of the weekly discussions. Students will also research a recent topic in the news and prepare a 5-7 minute presentation on the topic. In addition, students will work in groups to prepare an educational video or other form of scientific communication (podcast, infographic, newspaper column, etc.) geared towards any age group about a topic related to the course. 

 

Laurie Mauger is a Lecturer in the Department of Biology. She received her Ph.D. in 2010 from Drexel University on population genetics and conservation of American crocodiles in Costa Rica. Since graduating, her research has focused on involving undergraduate students in research on projects focusing on population genetics of crocodiles, caterpillars, ringtail cats, and ants. Today, Dr. Mauger focuses mainly on pedagogical research investigating the impact of course-based research projects on student learning and attitude towards science and nature. She has published 5 scientific papers and is working with students to submit several more. Dr. Mauger has taught a variety undergraduate level courses on genetics, evolution, general biology, conservation biology at institutions such as Princeton University, Drexel University, and Southern University and a graduate level course in population genetics at Cedar Crest College. She joined the faculty at Duke in 2018.

LS 780-32 - Human Rights Futures
Fall 2020
Thursdays, 6:15-8:45 pm
GLS Conference Room
NEW COURSE
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This class will establish some of the foundations and histories of human rights, then take an in-depth look at the challenges that face us as a world community. This includes using a human rights lens to think about refugees and asylum-seekers; climate change; genetic engineering; privacy; the right to truth; and international humanitarian law. This class is interdisciplinary and discussion-based. We will be examining real-life cases from around the world and including the United States. Readings will include materials prepared by philosophers, historians, activists, lawyers, documentarians, anthropologists, and journalists, among others. 

Students will prepare one midterm paper and a final presentation on an issue chosen in consultation with the instructor. Since this is a seminar, attendance and participation are mandatory. 

Robin Kirk is the Faculty Co-Chair of the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute and is a founding member of the Pauli Murray Project, an initiative of the center that seeks to use the legacy of this Durham daughter to examine the region’s past of slavery, segregation and continuing economic inequality. An author and human rights advocate, Kirk is a lecturer in the Department of Cultural Anthropology and directs the Human Rights Certificate. Kirk has written three books, including More Terrible Than Death: Massacres, Drugs and America’s War in Colombia (Public Affairs) and The Monkey’s Paw: New Chronicles from Peru (University of Massachusetts Press). She is a co-editor of The Peru Reader: History, Culture, Politics (Duke University) and co edits Duke University Press’s “World Readers” series. An essayist and award-winning poet, she has published widely on issues as diverse as the Andes, torture, the politics of memory, family life and pop culture. Her essay on Belfast, “City of Walls,” is included in the Best American Travel Writing anthology of 2012 (Mariner Books). Kirk authored, co-authored and edited over twelve reports for Human Rights Watch, all available on-line. In the 1980s, Kirk reported for U.S. media from Peru, where she covered the war between the government and the Shining Path. She continues to write for US media, and has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, Sojourners, The American Scholar, the Raleigh News and Observer, the Boston Globe, the Durham Herald Sun and other media.

Instructor:
Deborah T. Gold
LS 780-57
Summer 2020
Mondays, 6:00 - 9:00 PM
Perkins LINK 087 (Classroom 3)
Begins *Monday, May 11 - Ends Monday, July 20 (no class on May 25)
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The purpose of this course is to better understand the processes and outcomes of death and dying. The US and other developed countries have become death phobic and have avoided interactions around death and dying. Both death and dying are culturally bound and strongly influenced by religious beliefs, we will take a interdisciplinary approach to our examination of these phenomena (including sociological, psychological, religious, biomedical, and social psychological). This will help us better understand how and where people die, multiple beliefs about life after death, and what drives the American population to experience anxiety and fear about death and dying more than any other culture in the world.

 

The course includes an overview of the biological process of dying and biomedical definitions of death, the social and psychological aspects of death and dying in modern American culture, death and dying as multicultural phenomena, the clinical issues around death and dying, and the management of those issues in an aging society.

 

Requirements include four short response papers, an oral presentation, and a final research paper.

About Deborah T. Gold
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences; Sociology, Psychology & Neuroscience

Deborah T. Gold is Professor of Medical Sociology in the Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Sociology, and Psychology & Neuroscience at Duke University Medical Center, where she is also a Senior Fellow of the Duke Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. Professor Gold received her B.A. in English and Latin from the University of Illinois, her M.Ed. in Reading from National Louis University, and her Ph.D. in Human Development and Social Policy from Northwestern University. Her primary research interests are in the psychological and social consequences of chronic disease in the elderly.  She has done seminal research on osteoporosis and its impact on quality of life.  She has also studied the psychosocial impact of breast cancer, Parkinson’s disease, syncope, head and neck cancer, Paget’s disease of bone, and dementia in older adults. Her current research examines compliance and persistence with medications for older adults with chronic illnesses.

Instructor:
Susan Thorne
LS 780-70
Summer 2020
Wednesdays, 6:00 - 9:00 PM
GLS Conference Room
Begins Wednesday, May 20 - Ends Wednesday, July 22
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For most of the past five hundred years, the overwhelming majority of the global population was governed by one of the major imperial powers (Ottoman, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, English, Hapsburg, and Russian/Soviet as well as the Chinese and Japanese Empires).   It was not until after the Second World War that the sun began to set on this age of empire, when anticolonial movements secured national independence and the nation state became the preeminent form of governance.  The long-standing impact of imperial governance on historical developments throughout the (formerly) colonized world is widely acknowledged.    Less recognized are the reciprocal effects of empire on the imperial home front.  Many of the technological, economic, cultural, and political attributes in which the developed world has taken a racialized pride were in fact products of the colonial encounter.  The economic “revolutions” of the 17th and 18th centuries (commercial, financial, industrial and consumer), political democratization—the inclusion of white workers and eventually women in the political nation-- in the 19th and 20th centuries, and the “tribal” warfare that nearly destroyed Europe between 1914-1918 and 1939-1945, were all profoundly shaped by the colonial contexts in which national and international events unfolded. 

 

Europe did not simply export “western civilization”, for good or ill, to the colonized world. This course will explore the connections through which a global modernity has emerged: connections between past and present, between colonized and colonizer, between underdeveloped and developed nations, between the West and the Rest.  Our method of inquiry is necessarily transnational and implicitly comparative.  It is also interdisciplinary.  We will be examining the colonial past and postcolonial present from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives: in addition to imperial, economic, military and social history, these include journalism, economics, international relations, law, medicine, anthropology, literary criticism, cultural studies, sexuality and gender studies, and public policy.

 

Requirements:  extensive reading, weekly reaction papers, and an independent research project.

About Susan Thorne
History

Susan Thorne, Associate Professor of History, teaches courses on the social history of Britain and the British Empire, and on the history of European expansion more generally. She is currently working on Charles Dickens’ influence on Anglo American “ways of seeing” the children of the urban poor.  The Dickensian Affect:  Reckonings with Reform in Early Victorian Southwark (in progress) juxtaposes Dickens’s representation of criminal poverty and urban childhood in his most popular novel, Oliver Twist (1837-8) to archival accounts generated by the poor law’s reform during the 1830s and hungry ‘40s. 

Instructor:
Robert Healy
LS 760-34
Spring 2020
Wednesdays, 6:15-8:45 PM
242 Classroom Building
*NEW COURSE* Begins January 15* - Ends April 15 (note: *Monday classes begin on Wednesday, January 8 to accommodate Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday on January 20; no class on March 11)
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People take the places where they spend their waking hours for granted.  Yet the landscape we inhabit is a complex product of history, of economics, of government action and of personal tastes.  For most of American history, where people lived depended on where they worked (and hence on the needs of the firms that employed them) and where they shopped and played depended on where they lived.  Technological changes, particularly highways and the Internet, would seem to fundamentally change those relationships, yet the hand of the past still lies heavily on the landscape.  This course will show how various forces produced the American landscape, the surprising role of a few “visionaries,” and how land use choices affect the natural environment.

 

Living:  Early cities, birth of the streetcar suburb, the “landscape of race,” post WWII suburbanization, slums and Urban Renewal, the abortive “New Town” movement, exurbs, urban revival, gentrification, second homes, New Urbanism

 

Working:  the Industrial Revolution, early offices, the elevator and the “skyscraper,” multi-story and one-story industrial buildings, agglomeration economies, growth of the service sector, women in the labor force, open offices, working from home, WeWork

 

Shopping:  the “high street,” the department store, Sears and catalog sales, the automobile and strip commercial, chain stores, Big Box I, Big Box II, the shopping mall (open and enclosed), outlet stores, dollar stores, e-commerce

 

Playing:  Olmsted and urban parks, National parks, rail tourism for the rich, automobile tourism (Blue Ridge Parkway), festival tourism (from Chatauqua to Woodstock to Burning Man), the Disney parks, virtual tourism

 

Impacts on the Environment – Air, Water, Land, Climate – Andrew Goudie (Human

Impact on the Natural Environment – Table 5.7 of fourth ed. – 7th ed online at Duke); urban wildlife

 

Driving Forces

 

The work-live-school nexus

Transportation technologies

Demographics

Visionaries (Andrew Jackson Downing, Olmsteds – father and son, Wallace Nichols, William Levitt, Robert Moses, Jane Jacobs, Victor Gruen, James Rouse, Andres Duany)

Government Action (the Vernacular Landscape v. the Official Landscape)

Literature and Art:  The Jungle, The Warmth of Other Suns, John Cheever (Checkov of the Suburbs—the Swimmer), Stepford Wives, David Sedaris, art (Riis, Lozowick, Ashcan School, John Sloan)

About Robert Healy
Nicholas School of the Environment

Bob Healy is Professor Emeritus of Environmental Policy in the Nicholas School and of Public Policy Studies in the Terry Sanford School. Before coming to Duke in 1986, he was a researcher with The Urban Institute, Resources for the Future and The Conservation Foundation/World Wildlife Fund in Washington, D.C. He has written ten books, mainly on issues of land use, environmental management and economic development. The latest are Knowledge and Environmental Policy (MIT 2011) and Environmental Policy in North America (Toronto 2013). Locally, he has long been involved with efforts to protect the New Hope Creek watershed. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California at Los Angeles.

Summer 2020
Study Away
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GLS Students may apply to one of four summer programs at Oxford for Duke credit. Duke tuition of $4050 will be billed via the bursar according to the summer billing schedule. Program fees, accommodations, and application deadlines vary according to program. All application materials and payment for program fees must be submitted to GLS, not Oxford. Director Anne Whisnant will provide letters of reference. Questions should be directed to Lisa Robinson Bailey (llrb@duke.edu). Please note that the International Politics Summer School is two-week course; all other courses are three weeks.

English Literature Summer School, Exeter College, July 5-25

  • Deadline to submit application to GLS: February 1, 2020
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2375
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite (limited availability): $2760
  • Non-refundable deposit due by application deadline: $500

Complete course information and application:https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/english-literature-summer-school

History, Politics and Society Summer School, Exeter College, July 5-25

  • Deadline to submit application to GLS: February 1, 2020
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2375
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite (limited availability): $2760
  • Non-refundable deposit due by application deadline: $500

Complete course information and application: https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/history-politics-society-summer-school

Creative Writing Summer School, Exeter College - DATES AND FEES TO BE ANNOUNCED IN JANUARY 2020

  • Deadline to submit application to GLS: February 1, 2019
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2375 (subject to change pending Oxford pricing)
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite (limited availability): $2760 (subject to change pending Oxford pricing)
  • Non-refundable deposit due by application deadline: $500

Note: Creative writing courses are offered at two levels. Level 1 courses are suitable for applicants who have completed one year of a full-time university degree course in creative writing or English literature. Level 2 is suitable for applicants who have completed two years of a full-time university degree course in creative writing or English literature. Please note that the summer school is not appropriate for those who have already achieved publication. You will need to submit samples of your work samples of your work which demonstrate your powers of creative expression. See the Oxford International Summer Schools website for specific guidelines for submitting you writing samples: https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/creative-writing-summer-school?code=...

International Politics Summer School, St. Antony’s College, August 2-15

  • Deadline to submit application to GLS: February 1, 2019
  • Room and board, en suite: $2350*
  • Room and board, shared facilities: $1810
  • Non-refundable deposit due by application deadline: $500

*At St. Antony’s College, students normally will have a single study bedroom with private bathroom facilities; a limited number of standard rooms with shared bathroom facilities is also available for a reduced fee as listed above.

Complete course information and application: https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/international-politics-summer-school

Explanation of Tuition and Program Fees:

Duke Tuition - $4212. Tuition will be charged to your bursar account and is due according to summer tuition schedule. This is the only part of the cost covered by GLS scholarship. Students wishing to make installment payment (Duke tuition portion ONLY), must be enrolled in the TMS plan. See www.bursar.duke.edu 

Program fees include access to Oxford’s IT facilities and the Continuing Education Library; accommodations, and meals (except lunch on Saturday and Sunday). You are responsible for your travel costs.

Applications must be received in the GLS office by the deadline noted above for each program. A non-refundable advance deposit of $500 is due by February 1 and may be paid to your bursar account via e-check (please select the "Nonrefundable Advance Deposit" option and specify that your advance deposit be applied against the summer 1 term). The balance will be billed with tuition via the bursar in mid-April and is due by May 12.

Cancellations:

All enrollments are subject to Oxford University Department for Continuing Education’s Terms and Conditions for Course Registration and Fee Payment. A contract between OUDCE and a student comes into being when an offer of a place on the summer school is made.

You have the right to cancel this contract at any time within 14 days, beginning on the day you received the offer, by declining the offer of a place. If you wish to cancel your place on the summer school you must inform the Oxford program administrator (Jacqueline Darvill) by email, as well as the GLS Office, dukegls@duke.edu.

Please be aware that if you cancel your place at any time after the expiry of the 14-day period you will not be entitled to a refund of the price paid for the summer school. Should you withdraw from the program after the 14-day cancellation period, you are responsible for the entire amount noted on Oxford’s website, payable in USD and at the exchange rate at the time of cancellation, to Duke University GLS.

You are expected to take out vacation cancellation insurance (to cover the total program fees and travel costs), and you should consult your travel agent and/or insurer for information and advice. Please note that Oxford University Department of Continuing Education does not provide any insurance coverage.

 

Instructor:
Amy Laura Hall
LS 770-98
Summer 2019
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:00 PM - Begins May 21-Ends July 23
GLS Conference Room
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In an August, 2018 interview, artist Boots Riley noted: “In the World of Film, We’ve Edited out All Rebellion” (the title of the interview, in Jacobin). In 1991, Anita Addison, an executive producer and director, explained in the Los Angeles Times: “There are plenty of men directors who are working today simply because they give good meeting” . . . “The industry right now does not accommodate the style of women.” In this seminar, we will read closely films created by African-American artists as acts of creative resistance to the intertwined forces of capitalism, racism, and sexism in the U.S. We will attend in particular to ways that artists acknowledge and bend the daily realities of fear and domination in workplaces, schools, and neighborhoods, as well as create openings for alternative futures. Films will include Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash), The Gifted (Audrey King Lewis), An Oversimplification of Her Beauty (Terence Nance), Bamboozled (Spike Lee), Get Out (Jordan Peele), and Sorry to Bother You (Boots Riley), among others to be determined. Television episodes and music videos will include work by Millicent Shelton, Debbie Allen, Sha-Rock, MC Lyte, Prince, Public Enemy, Mos Def, Daniel Glover, Chris Rock, Common, Aaron McGruder, Erykah Badu, and Janelle Monae. Assignments will include close-reading papers (due each session) and regular participation. Regular participation involves listening and attending to the words of other students as well as speaking words of your own.

About Amy Laura Hall
Divinity School

Amy Laura Hall is the author of four books: Kierkegaard and the Treachery of Love, Conceiving Parenthood: The Protestant Spirit of Biotechnological Reproduction, Writing Home with Love: Politics for Neighbors and Naysayers, and Laughing at the Devil: Seeing the World with Julian of Norwich. She has also written numerous scholarly articles in theological and biomedical ethics.

Instructor:
Martin Miller
LS 780-15
Fall 2019
Tuesdays, 6:15-8:45 pm
Classroom Building 241 (East Campus)
Begins August 27 - Ends November 26 (no class on October 8)
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This course will focus on the extraordinary cultural developments which emerged in Russia during the period when the country evolved from an Imperial autocracy to a socialist empire. The great divide were the revolutions of 1917, which together ended the Romanov monarchy and brought to power a radical Bolshevik party intent on constructing a utopian transformation of society. In the years prior to the First World War during the reign of Nicholas II, Russia experienced a paradoxical set of currents dominated by political decline and cultural awakening. The upsurge in innovations in literature, painting, photography, dance and the cinema that dominated the Silver Age before the revolution maintained some degree of continuity in the early years of the post-revolutionary society of the Soviet Union. Under the banner of socialist construction, new forms of artistic endeavor and experimentation were encouraged and funded by the new regime. Yet, by the end of the 1920s, the ruling communist regime established a doctrinal consensus that led to the abolition of all other political parties at home and the creation of a global confrontation abroad that would later be named the Cold War.

           

We will analyze these contradictory forces, which were so influential during the transition period from tsars to commissars in Russia. Using both print sources as well as examples of the exciting art forms of the era, we shall seek to answer a number of problems which emerged in this historical time frame, including the important question of how culture and politics interact with one another in two entirely different governmental systems.

 

Readings:

Edward Acton, Russia

Steven Marks, How Russia Shaped the Modern World

Selections from the literature, plastic arts and cinema of the time period will be made available,

 

Requirements:

There will be several short response papers in which students will analyze the artistic forms under study in their historical context, and a longer essay due at the end of the term which will permit research in greater depth on any aspect of Russian culture.

 

About Martin Miller
History

Martin Miller received his Ph.D. in Russian history at the University of Chicago and has taught at Stanford University and the New School for Social Research. He has been a member of the History Department at Duke for many years. Dr. Miller has conducted archival research in Russia and Western Europe, and has received numerous grants, among which are the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Ford Foundation, the National Council on Russian and Eastern European Studies, and the International Research and Exchanges Board (IREX).

Instructor:
Susan Thorne
LS 780-88
Fall 2019
Mondays, 6:30 - 9:00 pm
Classroom Building 242 (East Campus)
Begins August 26 - Ends November 25 (no class on October 7)
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The enduring power of Charles Dickens’ representation of urban crime was on regular display in the critical response to The Wire (HBO 2002-2007), which is regarded by many as still the “greatest television series of all time.” The series is a graphic representation of the horrendous violence generated by the war on drugs in Baltimore, Maryland, the “murder capital” of the United States.  It is difficult to imagine a world further removed from the Victorian nostalgia of the Dickens presented in Masterpiece Theatre much less Hollywood productions of Oliver Twist, the novel to which the series is most often compared.  Critics on both shores of the Atlantic have referred to The Wire as “Dickens for the 21st Century.”    “If Charles Dickens were alive today, he would watch The Wire, unless, that is, he was already writing for it.”  This course embraces the comparative invitation issued in such reviews.  It juxtaposes these two tales about crime as well as the very different cities in which each is set: early Victorian London and present day Baltimore, Maryland. In addition to these comparisons, we will also try to account for Dickens’ enduring relevance, the longevity of Dickensian ways of seeing crime, childhood, and the city.  Why—and how—does Dickens continue to matter? 

 

Requirements

 

Informed participation in class discussions (30%)

 

Students are expected to view The Wire in its entirety (5 seasons, about 50 episodes) outside of class, while reading Dickens’s Oliver Twist, in addition to the interdisciplinary assortment of scholarly works and investigative journalism accessible via the class website.

 

Students will submit weekly paragraph to page reactions to each week’s reading assignments on discussion board forums (required but not graded)

 

Group project (30%) 

Research paper (40%)

About Susan Thorne
History

Susan Thorne, Associate Professor of History, teaches courses on the social history of Britain and the British Empire, and on the history of European expansion more generally. She is currently working on Charles Dickens’ influence on Anglo American “ways of seeing” the children of the urban poor.  The Dickensian Affect:  Reckonings with Reform in Early Victorian Southwark (in progress) juxtaposes Dickens’s representation of criminal poverty and urban childhood in his most popular novel, Oliver Twist (1837-8) to archival accounts generated by the poor law’s reform during the 1830s and hungry ‘40s. 

Instructor:
Amy Laura Hall
LS 770-78
Spring 2020
Mondays, 6:15-8:45 PM
GLS Conference Room
*Begins *WEDNESDAY, January 8 - Ends Monday, April 13 (note: *Monday classes begin on Wednesday, January 8 to accommodate Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday on January 20; no class on January 20 and March 9
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Sin has been narrated as social and as personal in mainstream, North American storytelling - as a matter of lies writ large and as a result of individual choice. Through a close reading of these works in North American literature, we will think through different ways of reckoning with trauma, accident, and systemic injustice. We will also consider ways that each author offers possibilities for continuing to risk the possibility of change, and even love. Readings include: Plum Bun: A Novel Without a Moral by Jessie Redmon Fauset, Does Your House Have Lions? by Sonia Sanchez, The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, The Solace of Leaving Early by Haven Kimmel, Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler, Moral Disorder and Other Stories by Margaret Atwood, and Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson.

 

Course requirements: Weekly in-class discussion of material and weekly close-reading papers (approximately 2 pp. double-spacing) on the text for the week. Participation in class is 40% of your grade; papers, 60%. Listening attentively to your neighbor is as important as speech for your participation grade. Visiting with me about the texts outside of class also counts as participation.

About Amy Laura Hall
Divinity School

Amy Laura Hall is the author of four books: Kierkegaard and the Treachery of Love, Conceiving Parenthood: The Protestant Spirit of Biotechnological Reproduction, Writing Home with Love: Politics for Neighbors and Naysayers, and Laughing at the Devil: Seeing the World with Julian of Norwich. She has also written numerous scholarly articles in theological and biomedical ethics.

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