Liberal Studies Seminars

Each year, Duke GLS offers a wide array of Liberal Studies (LS) Seminars developed exclusively for its students, including the GLS core course.  Students in the program also can take graduate courses (500-level and higher) from across campus.  For further details about course grades and requirements, see the RegistrationDegree Requirements or Academic Policies pages.  

Instructor:
Amy Laura Hall
LS 780-92
Spring 2023
Mondays, 6:00PM-9:00PM
GLS Conference Room
Show Details

Click here to watch the course video.

In the 2008 documentary Bigger, Stronger, Faster, Chris Bell begins with the World Wide Wrestling Federation’s carnivalesque version of geopolitics, as Hulk Hogan battled The Iron Sheik during the 1984 season.  Bell tells a story about his two brothers on steroids, but the film is also about how athleticism and militarism have been intertwined to confuse, amuse, and distract.  Bell points out that the U.S. Congress spent more hours during 2005 investigating steroid use in Major League Baseball than on the response to Hurricane Katrina or on the Iraq War. We will consider myths of masculinity and war in the U.S., using film, historiography, podcasts, and readily available chapters and essays.  Readings may include selections from War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War(John Dower); Stiffed: The Betrayal of the American Man (Susan Faludi); and Black Sexual Politics (Patricia Hill  Collins).  Films may include Modern TimesHigh NoonThe Defiant OnesThe Fog of War, Friday Night LightsSorry to Bother You, and Get Out. Assignments include participation in discussion and 2-3 page close-reading papers on the reading or film for that week.

About Amy Laura Hall
Divinity School

GLS Advisory Committee Term: 2021-24

Amy Laura Hall is the author of four books: Kierkegaard and the Treachery of Love, Conceiving Parenthood: The Protestant Spirit of Biotechnological Reproduction, Writing Home with Love: Politics for Neighbors and Naysayers, and Laughing at the Devil: Seeing the World with Julian of Norwich. She has also written numerous scholarly articles in theological and biomedical ethics. Her new essay on Kierkegaard and love will appear in the T&T Clark Companion to the Theology of Kierkegaard (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2019). Her book Laughing at the Devil was chosen for the 2019 Virginia Festival of the Book and as a focus lecture for the Chautauqua Institution in June, 2019. She continues work on a longer research project on masculinity and gender anxiety in mainstream, white evangelicalism.

Professor Hall has served on the steering committee of the Genome Ethics, Law, and Policy Center, the Bioethics Task Force of the United Methodist Church, and as consultant on bioethics to the World Council of Churches. She has served on the steering committee of the Genome Ethics, Law, and Policy Center and as a faculty member for the Focus Program of the Institute on Genome Sciences and Policy. She served as a faculty adviser with the Duke Center for Civic Engagement and as a faculty advisor for the NCCU-Duke Program in African, African American & Diaspora Studies. She currently teaches with and serves on the faculty advisory board for Graduate Liberal Studies and serves as a core faculty member of the Focus Program in Global Health. Hall serves as an elder in the Rio Texas Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church.

Instructor:
Robin Kirk
LS 780-32 - Human Rights Futures
Spring 2023
Thursdays, 6-9 PM
GLS House
Show Details

Watch a course preview. 

This class will establish some of the foundations and histories of human rights, then take an in-depth look at the challenges that face us as a world community. This includes using a human rights lens to think about refugees and asylum-seekers; climate change; genetic engineering; privacy; the right to truth; and international humanitarian law. This class is interdisciplinary and discussion-based. We will be examining real-life cases from around the world and including the United States. Readings will include materials prepared by philosophers, historians, activists, lawyers, documentarians, anthropologists, and journalists, among others. 

Students will prepare one midterm paper and a final presentation on an issue chosen in consultation with the instructor. Since this is a seminar, attendance and participation are mandatory. 


The development and initial offering of this new course in the Fall of 2020 was supported through the generosity of GLS alumna Lottie Applewhite.


Robin Kirk is the Faculty Co-Chair of the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute and is a founding member of the Pauli Murray Project, an initiative of the center that seeks to use the legacy of this Durham daughter to examine the region’s past of slavery, segregation and continuing economic inequality. An author and human rights advocate, Kirk is a lecturer in the Department of Cultural Anthropology and directs the Human Rights Certificate. Kirk has written three books, including More Terrible Than Death: Massacres, Drugs and America’s War in Colombia (Public Affairs) and The Monkey’s Paw: New Chronicles from Peru (University of Massachusetts Press). She is a co-editor of The Peru Reader: History, Culture, Politics (Duke University) and co edits Duke University Press’s “World Readers” series. An essayist and award-winning poet, she has published widely on issues as diverse as the Andes, torture, the politics of memory, family life and pop culture. Her essay on Belfast, “City of Walls,” is included in the Best American Travel Writing anthology of 2012 (Mariner Books). Kirk authored, co-authored and edited over twelve reports for Human Rights Watch, all available on-line. In the 1980s, Kirk reported for U.S. media from Peru, where she covered the war between the government and the Shining Path. She continues to write for US media, and has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, Sojourners, The American Scholar, the Raleigh News and Observer, the Boston Globe, the Durham Herald Sun and other media.

About Robin Kirk
Cultural Anthropology

Robin Kirk is the Faculty Co-Chair of the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute and is a founding member of the Pauli Murray Project, an initiative of the center that seeks to use the legacy of this Durham daughter to examine the region’s past of slavery, segregation and continuing economic inequality. An author and human rights advocate, Kirk is a lecturer in the Department of Cultural Anthropology and directs the Human Rights Certificate. Kirk has written three books, including More Terrible Than Death: Massacres, Drugs and America’s War in Colombia (Public Affairs) and The Monkey’s Paw: New Chronicles from Peru (University of Massachusetts Press). She is a co-editor of The Peru Reader: History, Culture, Politics (Duke University) and co edits Duke University Press’s “World Readers” series. An essayist and award-winning poet, she has published widely on issues as diverse as the Andes, torture, the politics of memory, family life and pop culture. Her essay on Belfast, “City of Walls,” is included in the Best American Travel Writing anthology of 2012 (Mariner Books). Kirk authored, co-authored and edited over twelve reports for Human Rights Watch, all available on-line. In the 1980s, Kirk reported for U.S. media from Peru, where she covered the war between the government and the Shining Path. She continues to write for US media, and has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, Sojourners, The American Scholar, the Raleigh News and Observer, the Boston Globe, the Durham Herald Sun and other media.

Instructor:
Susan Thorne
770-01
Fall 2022
Wednesdays, 2-5 PM
GLS House, 2114 Campus Drive
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Recent reckonings with race remind us that as Faulkner famously put it, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.”[1]  This course engages the history of inequality from the vantage point of the family, one of the most influential sites at which the past is imprinted on the future.  The family plays a key role in  the intergenerational transfer of wealth as well as the transmission of identities and values from which difference is culturally constructed.  The study of family history is itself an important site at which historic inequalities are reproduced as well as contested.  Genealogy as embraced in the United States during the second half of the 19th century advanced deeply racialized claims to national belonging and respectability that have had enduring  consequences.  In organizations like the Daughters of the American Revolution, founded in 1890, and the United Daughters of the Confederacy, founded in 1894, elite white women used genealogical descent to  recast legitimate political authority and citizenship itself in terms that reinforced the political hegemony of White Anglo Saxon native born Protestant men over their foreign-born and formerly enslaved counterparts.

Family history is no longer the preserve of leisured patrician whites.  The expansion and desegregation of public education and archives alike, along with the digitization of source material, sophisticated search engines and powerful data bases have made it possible to learn a lot more about all sorts of people than simply the ancestral lineages of the 1%.  There is now an impressive body of scholarship devoted to locating the histories of particular families in deeply researched historical contexts, resulting in more detailed understandings of how privilege and opportunity have been preserved as well as  challenged at specific times and places. There are still vast inequalities in preservation and access to source material, but the insights being gleaned from more critical approaches to family history are many and profound.  And the transformative potential of family reckonings with inequality is even more transformative when the family in question is one’s own.

Course assignments:

Scholarly literature:

We will be reading scholarly accounts of race-making and resistance at the local level.

Linda Gordon, The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction

We will also sample scholarly accounts of race-making or resistance in their own or other’s family history. 

Edward Ball, Slaves in the family

Kendra Taira Field, Growing up with the country

Christine Steeler, “Critical Family History:  An Introduction” special issue Genealogy 4/2 (2020) 64.  https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020064  [MDPI Scholarly Open Access Publishing]

Diane Kenaston, Geneaology and Anti-Racism:  A Resource for White People

Genealogy: 

Students will research their own family history utilizing the burgeoning digital source base available on-line.

Christine Steeler, “Critical Family History:  An Introduction” special issue Genealogy 4/2 (2020) 64.  https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020064  [MDPI Scholarly Open Access Publishing] and https://www.christinesleeter.org/critical-family-history

Diane Kenaston, Geneaology and Anti-Racism:  A Resource for White People

Our Black Ancestry:  https://ourblackancestry.com/

Coming to the Table:  genealogy guide https://comingtothetable.org/project/genealogy-support/

And/or students will conduct research on race relations in a particular neighborhood, town, or county to which they have some personal connection.

Writing assignments

Students will submit 1-2 page reactions to scholarly readings on the designated Sakai forum 2 days before class meets and respond to their classmates’ posts the following day. 

Students will create a blog on which to record their local/family research findings.  For inspiration see  Robyn Smith, Reclaiming Kin, Kay Strickland,  Shoots, Roots and Leaves

 

 

 


[1] Requiem for a Nun (NY:  Random House, 1951), p. 92. 

About Susan Thorne
History

GLS Advisory Committee Term: 2019-2022

Susan Thorne, Associate Professor of History, teaches courses on the social history of Britain and the British Empire, and on the history of European expansion more generally. She is currently working on Charles Dickens’ influence on Anglo American “ways of seeing” the children of the urban poor.  The Dickensian Affect:  Reckonings with Reform in Early Victorian Southwark (in progress) juxtaposes Dickens’s representation of criminal poverty and urban childhood in his most popular novel, Oliver Twist (1837-8) to archival accounts generated by the poor law’s reform during the 1830s and hungry ‘40s. 

LS 770-45
Spring 2023
Wednesdays 6-9 PM
GLS House, 2114 Campus Drive
Show Details

INSTRUCTOR: Michelle Dove

CLICK HERE TO WATCH A COURSE PREVIEW VIDEO

The words—incredibly—are all we have, but a good story wilts without structure. Arriving at the knowledge that content dictates structure, this course will allow you to explore structural possibilities for your nonfiction, fiction or hybrid-genre writing.

One creative nonfiction form that increasingly renews itself and its staying power is the lyric essay, a moldable structure that draws from poetry, essay and memoir to distill a way of thinking onto the page. At peak form, lyric essays invite readers to engage in more nuanced and subtle arguments than traditional essays might, without sacrificing the freshness and musicality paramount to poetry. Under the lyrical spell, the reader turns activated thinker and participant in a context that you, as the writer, along with your content, establish. What the writer of the lyric essay leaves out is of equal concern to what the writer includes.

With lyric essays, essays on craft and short stories as our primary texts, this workshop and discussion-based course will examine the choices we make as writers at the sentence and structural-levels, with the goal of illuminating what makes a personal narrative or story satisfying or complete. Students in this course will read, write and workshop their own nonfiction, fiction or hybrid-genre work, investigating the dynamic among the story, the world outside the story, the reader and the author. Our analysis will focus on the recursion of language and structure to bring about what Gordon Lish calls the “swerve”—i.e. the inevitable yet surprising conclusion—for every work we encounter. Using David Foster Wallace’s lens to probe creative nonfiction, we will further investigate our motivations for writing personal narratives “other than sheer truthfulness,” allowing for simultaneous creative goals of informing, instructing, entertaining, persuading, edifying, amusing and intriguing our readers. Readings will include work by authors such as Claudia Rankine, Eileen Myles, Anne Boyer, Michelle Chan Brown, Mary Ruefle, Amy Hempel, Susan Steinberg, Lynne Tillman, Lyn Hejinian, Roxane Gay, Dorothy Allison, Annie Dillard, Joan Didion and Nathalie Leger.

MICHELLE DOVE is a multi-genre writer and musician. Since joining the staff of the Duke English Department in 2016, she has taught fiction, nonfiction and poetry writing at Duke and, more recently, at Night School Bar in Durham. She is the author of Radio Cacophony, a linked collection of short prose, and a co-owner and operator of SPINSTER, a radical feminist record label founded in 2018 that has released albums featured in The New York Times, NPR, The Washington Post, and Rolling Stone. Since 2016, she has also served as an Associate Series Editor for the Wigleaf Top 50.

LS 780-01
Fall 2022
Mondays, 6-9 PM
Rueben-Cooke Building 129 [new location]
Show Details

Instructor: Rachael Murphey, PhD

Course Description
The primary goal of this course is to unpack the dense intersection of race and the adoption and foster care systems in the United States. We will do this by studying the policies and practices of domestic transracial and international or inter country adoption and foster care. We will critically interrogate issues of power and privilege among and between individuals as well as sovereign nations and we will learn from all members of the adoption triad (birth/first parents, adoptees, and adopting parents). We will consider academic research, novels, documentaries and feature films. We will also have presentations from the Children’s Home Society of North Carolina, social workers, Guardian Ad Litems, adult transracial and intercountry adoptees, and adoptive parents from Orange and Durham county.

Additional goals for this course include sustained opportunities to engage in debate and discussion, as well as opportunities to research, write persuasively, and present your findings to a larger, non-academic audience.

Course Learning Objectives

After completing this course students will be able to:

  1. Identify and explain the historical and systematic factors that fuel adoption and foster care in the U.S. and abroad, including major events, leaders and legislation.
  2. Understand how the US child welfare system functions, under what authority, and the major provisions that guide and fund it.
  3. Identify and explain the ethical issues and conflicts in the history and current policies and practice of intercountry/transnational adoption between the U.S. and Africa, China, Latin America, and Russia.
  4. Identify and critically interrogate how concepts of race, adoption, and foster care are represented through popular culture (television, social media, movies, etc.) in the U.S. and abroad.
  5. Identify and explain how race is understood as a factor of analysis in foster care and adoption placement in Durham and Orange County, North Carolina.
Instructor:
Chris Sims
LS 760-01
Fall 2022
Thursdays, 6-9 PM
Classroom Building 106 [new location]
Show Details

Watch a course preview video.  

Students will be introduced to strategies for conducting documentary fieldwork and archival research with a variety of tools and mediums, including photography, film/video, audio, narrative writing, and poetry. A major focus will be on identifying and analyzing the ethical and aesthetic considerations related to representing and exhibiting the lives and stories of others, and/or ourselves.

We will plumb the depths and range of documentary expression with assigned materials that include thought pieces (reflections written by practitioners on process, context, dilemmas, and/or mistakes), reviews/critiques, as well actual documentaries. All assigned materials—readings and links to podcasts and videos—will be made available on Sakai.

We will begin our exploration by considering why documentary stories are important, what makes a compelling story, and how various media forms are employed by documentary artists. Subsequently, our discussions will address questions fundamental to any documentary form concerning issues such as point of view, representation, reciprocity, truth, editing, and ethics. Hands- on activities, interspersed throughout the semester, will allow students to engage with documentary forms and questions.

Students will propose, research, and carry-out a creative documentary project for the course, which will be work-shopped during class sessions. Possible outcomes could include a podcast, photo series, video piece, drawings, or narrative non-fiction essay.

Equipment is not provided, but students will be advised about a range of readily-available tools (smart phones and apps) and low or no-cost approaches that could be used. No previous experience or technical skills required; project formats are flexible.

The following are major pedagogical goals for the course:

  • Identify and address the complexities involved in representing others.
     
  • Contextualize documentary work historically and comparatively.
     
  • Understand the present-day call from BIPOC documentarians for accountability and culture shift in the documentary field
     
  • Learn about documentary studies at Duke University.
     
  • Engage with a variety of genres of documentary work.
     
  • Identify biases within—as well as voices and themes traditionally missing from—the documentary field.
     
  • Synthesize knowledge from readings, screenings, and speakers.
     
  • Reflect on how documentary practices inform and inspire social change.
     
  • Imagine new uses and forms of documentary work based on an understanding of the evolution of documentary forms.
     
  • Understand major ethical dilemmas involved in doing and exhibiting documentary work.
About Chris Sims
Sanford School of Public Policy / Center for Documentary Studies
LS 760 - 38
Fall 2021
Thursdays, 6-9 PM
GLS House, 2114 Campus Drive
Show Details

Watch a course preview video.  

Students will be introduced to strategies for conducting documentary fieldwork and archival research with a variety of tools and mediums, including photography, film/video, audio, narrative writing, and poetry. A major focus will be on identifying and analyzing the ethical and aesthetic considerations related to representing and exhibiting the lives and stories of others, and/or ourselves.

We will plumb the depths and range of documentary expression with assigned materials that include thought pieces (reflections written by practitioners on process, context, dilemmas, and/or mistakes), reviews/critiques, as well actual documentaries. All assigned materials—readings and links to podcasts and videos—will be made available on Sakai.

We will begin our exploration by considering why documentary stories are important, what makes a compelling story, and how various media forms are employed by documentary artists. Subsequently, our discussions will address questions fundamental to any documentary form concerning issues such as point of view, representation, reciprocity, truth, editing, and ethics. Hands- on activities, interspersed throughout the semester, will allow students to engage with documentary forms and questions.

Students will propose, research, and carry-out a creative documentary project for the course, which will be work-shopped during class sessions. Possible outcomes could include a podcast, photo series, video piece, drawings, or narrative non-fiction essay.

Equipment is not provided, but students will be advised about a range of readily-available tools (smart phones and apps) and low or no-cost approaches that could be used. No previous experience or technical skills required; project formats are flexible.

The following are major pedagogical goals for the course:

  • Identify and address the complexities involved in representing others.
     
  • Contextualize documentary work historically and comparatively.
     
  • Understand the present-day call from BIPOC documentarians for accountability and culture shift in the documentary field
     
  • Learn about documentary studies at Duke University.
     
  • Engage with a variety of genres of documentary work.
     
  • Identify biases within—as well as voices and themes traditionally missing from—the documentary field.
     
  • Synthesize knowledge from readings, screenings, and speakers.
     
  • Reflect on how documentary practices inform and inspire social change.
     
  • Imagine new uses and forms of documentary work based on an understanding of the evolution of documentary forms.
     
  • Understand major ethical dilemmas involved in doing and exhibiting documentary work.
LS 760-39
Fall 2021
Thursdays, 3-6 PM
GLS House, 2114 Campus Drive
Begins August 21 - Ends November 23
Show Details

Watch a course preview video.  

Students will be introduced to strategies for conducting documentary fieldwork and archival research with a variety of tools and mediums, including photography, film/video, audio, narrative writing, and poetry. A major focus will be on identifying and analyzing the ethical and aesthetic considerations related to representing and exhibiting the lives and stories of others, and/or ourselves.

We will plumb the depths and range of documentary expression with assigned materials that include thought pieces (reflections written by practitioners on process, context, dilemmas, and/or mistakes), reviews/critiques, as well actual documentaries. All assigned materials—readings and links to podcasts and videos—will be made available on Sakai.

We will begin our exploration by considering why documentary stories are important, what makes a compelling story, and how various media forms are employed by documentary artists. Subsequently, our discussions will address questions fundamental to any documentary form concerning issues such as point of view, representation, reciprocity, truth, editing, and ethics. Hands- on activities, interspersed throughout the semester, will allow students to engage with documentary forms and questions.

Students will propose, research, and carry-out a creative documentary project for the course, which will be work-shopped during class sessions. Possible outcomes could include a podcast, photo series, video piece, drawings, or narrative non-fiction essay.

Equipment is not provided, but students will be advised about a range of readily-available tools (smart phones and apps) and low or no-cost approaches that could be used. No previous experience or technical skills required; project formats are flexible.

The following are major pedagogical goals for the course:

  • Identify and address the complexities involved in representing others.
     
  • Contextualize documentary work historically and comparatively.
     
  • Understand the present-day call from BIPOC documentarians for accountability and culture shift in the documentary field
     
  • Learn about documentary studies at Duke University.
     
  • Engage with a variety of genres of documentary work.
     
  • Identify biases within—as well as voices and themes traditionally missing from—the documentary field.
     
  • Synthesize knowledge from readings, screenings, and speakers.
     
  • Reflect on how documentary practices inform and inspire social change.
     
  • Imagine new uses and forms of documentary work based on an understanding of the evolution of documentary forms.
     
  • Understand major ethical dilemmas involved in doing and exhibiting documentary work.
Instructor:
Thomas Brothers
LS 770-05
Fall 2021
Tuesdays, 6:15-8:45 pm
Mary Duke Biddle 069
Show Details

WATCH A COURSE PREVIEW The YouTube icon, full colour
 

This course explores musical experience according to three different dimensions: first, music as a social phenomenon, second as an emotional one, and finally as transcendental (aka ineffable, spiritual, sublime, holy). Examples are drawn from African-American music in New Orleans, popular music, jazz, Bach and Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and the Romantics, sacred music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, John Coltrane, and Gospel.

 

Each of us already has a sense of music as a social phenomenon.  We like a certain kind of music, in part, is because it helps define our peer group, social class, and self-identity as a rebellious person, a conformist, and so on.  All music is socially conceived, but some kinds of music invest heavily in this project.  Many genres of African-American music, for example, are designed to bring people together in a participatory way.  The inquiry extends to the use of music as a way to energize ideologies.

 

Most people are also aware of their own emotional experience of music, but it is possible to go further.  We have been taught how to articulate emotions in socialized ways, and this can be observed musically. Musical gestures correspond with feelings. This section of the course includes readings on emotions, neuroscience and music. 

 

It is challenging to talk about music as a transcendental phenomenon, but that does not invalidate the experience.  For the nineteenth-century Romantics, music was the queen of the arts because of its ability to transport listeners into ethereal realms.  African-American churches rely on music to do the same thing as they try to connect with the Holy Spirit.  We may separate the themes of social, emotional and transcendental for analytical purposes, but in the end they are closely connected. This is demonstrated by another African-American example: the participatory music-making of nineteenth-century slaves was primarily social at the same time that it was intensely emotional and also transcendental, the latter indicated by the name of the great body of music that emerged—the Spirituals.

About Thomas Brothers
Music

GLS Advisory Committee Term: 2019-2022

Thomas Brothers is Professor of Music.  He joined the faculty at Duke in 1991 after completing his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley.  He has published three books on Louis Armstrong, most recently Louis Armstrong, Master of Modernism (W.W. Norton, 2014).  In addition to African American music, Professor Brothers also teaches music of the medieval and renaissance periods. His most recent book, Help! The Beatles, Duke Ellington, and the Magic of Collaboration, was published in 2018.

Summer 2022
Study Away
Show Details

GLS Students may apply to one of four summer programs at Oxford for Duke credit. Duke tuition of $4212 will be billed via the bursar according to the summer billing schedule. Program fees, accommodations, and application deadlines vary according to program. Students will be issued a permission number to register for Duke credit upon admission to their chosen programEmail Lisa Robinson Bailey for application details and to declare you intent to apply. Please note that the International Politics Summer School is two-week course; all other courses are three weeks.

English Literature Summer School, Exeter College, Sun 03 Jul 2022 - Sat 23 Jul 2022

  • Deadline to submit application:: March 1 for first gathered field; click here for additional deadlines
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2545
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite: $2950

Complete course information and application for English Literature.

History, Politics and Society Summer School, Exeter College, Sun 03 Jul 2022 - Sat 23 Jul 2022

  • Deadline to submit application:: March 1 for first gathered field; click here for additional deadlines
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2545
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite: $2950

Complete course information and application for History, Politics & Society.

Creative Writing Summer School (Intermediate and Advanced programs), Exeter College, Sun 24 Jul 2022 - Sat 13 Aug 2022

  • Deadline to submit application:: March 15 for first gathered field; click here for additional deadlines
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2545 
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite: $2950

Complete course information and application for Creative Writing

International Politics Summer School, St. Antony’s College, Sun 31 Jul 2022 - Sat 13 Aug 2022

Complete course information and application for International Politics.

Explanation of Tuition and Program Fees:

Duke tuition ($4212) and room and board at Oxford will be charged to your bursar account and is due according to summer tuition schedule.  Students wishing to make installment payment (Duke tuition portion ONLY), must be enrolled in the TMS plan. See www.bursar.duke.edu 

Program fees include access to Oxford’s IT facilities and the Continuing Education Library; accommodations, and meals (except lunch on Saturday and Sunday). You are responsible for your travel costs.

Cancellations conditions set forth by Oxford University:

All enrollments are subject to Oxford University Department for Continuing Education’s Terms and Conditions for Course Registration and Fee Payment. A contract between OUDCE and a student comes into being when an offer of a place on the summer school is made.

You have the right to cancel this contract at any time within 14 days, beginning on the day you received the offer, by declining the offer of a place. If you wish to cancel your place on the summer school you must inform the Oxford program administrator (Jacqueline Darvill) by email, as well as the GLS Office, dukegls@duke.edu.

Please be aware that if you cancel your place at any time after the expiry of the 14-day period you will not be entitled to a refund of the price paid for the summer school. Should you withdraw from the program after the 14-day cancellation period, you are responsible for the entire amount noted on Oxford’s website, payable in USD and at the exchange rate at the time of cancellation, to Duke University GLS.

You are expected to take out vacation cancellation insurance (to cover the total program fees and travel costs), and you should consult your travel agent and/or insurer for information and advice. Please note that Oxford University Department of Continuing Education does not provide any insurance coverage.

 

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