Liberal Studies Seminars

Each year, Duke GLS offers a wide array of Liberal Studies (LS) Seminars developed exclusively for its students, including the GLS core course.  Students in the program also can take graduate courses (500-level and higher) from across campus.  For further details about course grades and requirements, see the RegistrationDegree Requirements or Academic Policies pages.  

Instructor:
Susan Thorne
770-01
Fall 2022
Wednesdays, 2-5 PM
GLS House, 2114 Campus Drive
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Recent reckonings with race remind us that as Faulkner famously put it, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.”[1]  This course engages the history of inequality from the vantage point of the family, one of the most influential sites at which the past is imprinted on the future.  The family plays a key role in  the intergenerational transfer of wealth as well as the transmission of identities and values from which difference is culturally constructed.  The study of family history is itself an important site at which historic inequalities are reproduced as well as contested.  Genealogy as embraced in the United States during the second half of the 19th century advanced deeply racialized claims to national belonging and respectability that have had enduring  consequences.  In organizations like the Daughters of the American Revolution, founded in 1890, and the United Daughters of the Confederacy, founded in 1894, elite white women used genealogical descent to  recast legitimate political authority and citizenship itself in terms that reinforced the political hegemony of White Anglo Saxon native born Protestant men over their foreign-born and formerly enslaved counterparts.

Family history is no longer the preserve of leisured patrician whites.  The expansion and desegregation of public education and archives alike, along with the digitization of source material, sophisticated search engines and powerful data bases have made it possible to learn a lot more about all sorts of people than simply the ancestral lineages of the 1%.  There is now an impressive body of scholarship devoted to locating the histories of particular families in deeply researched historical contexts, resulting in more detailed understandings of how privilege and opportunity have been preserved as well as  challenged at specific times and places. There are still vast inequalities in preservation and access to source material, but the insights being gleaned from more critical approaches to family history are many and profound.  And the transformative potential of family reckonings with inequality is even more transformative when the family in question is one’s own.

Course assignments:

Scholarly literature:

We will be reading scholarly accounts of race-making and resistance at the local level.

Linda Gordon, The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction

We will also sample scholarly accounts of race-making or resistance in their own or other’s family history. 

Edward Ball, Slaves in the family

Kendra Taira Field, Growing up with the country

Christine Steeler, “Critical Family History:  An Introduction” special issue Genealogy 4/2 (2020) 64.  https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020064  [MDPI Scholarly Open Access Publishing]

Diane Kenaston, Geneaology and Anti-Racism:  A Resource for White People

Genealogy: 

Students will research their own family history utilizing the burgeoning digital source base available on-line.

Christine Steeler, “Critical Family History:  An Introduction” special issue Genealogy 4/2 (2020) 64.  https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020064  [MDPI Scholarly Open Access Publishing] and https://www.christinesleeter.org/critical-family-history

Diane Kenaston, Geneaology and Anti-Racism:  A Resource for White People

Our Black Ancestry:  https://ourblackancestry.com/

Coming to the Table:  genealogy guide https://comingtothetable.org/project/genealogy-support/

And/or students will conduct research on race relations in a particular neighborhood, town, or county to which they have some personal connection.

Writing assignments

Students will submit 1-2 page reactions to scholarly readings on the designated Sakai forum 2 days before class meets and respond to their classmates’ posts the following day. 

Students will create a blog on which to record their local/family research findings.  For inspiration see  Robyn Smith, Reclaiming Kin, Kay Strickland,  Shoots, Roots and Leaves

 

 

 


[1] Requiem for a Nun (NY:  Random House, 1951), p. 92. 

About Susan Thorne
History

GLS Advisory Committee Term: 2019-2022

Susan Thorne, Associate Professor of History, teaches courses on the social history of Britain and the British Empire, and on the history of European expansion more generally. She is currently working on Charles Dickens’ influence on Anglo American “ways of seeing” the children of the urban poor.  The Dickensian Affect:  Reckonings with Reform in Early Victorian Southwark (in progress) juxtaposes Dickens’s representation of criminal poverty and urban childhood in his most popular novel, Oliver Twist (1837-8) to archival accounts generated by the poor law’s reform during the 1830s and hungry ‘40s. 

Instructor:
Chris Sims
LS 760-01
Fall 2022
Thursdays, 6-9 PM
Classroom Building 106 [new location]
Show Details

Watch a course preview video.  

Students will be introduced to strategies for conducting documentary fieldwork and archival research with a variety of tools and mediums, including photography, film/video, audio, narrative writing, and poetry. A major focus will be on identifying and analyzing the ethical and aesthetic considerations related to representing and exhibiting the lives and stories of others, and/or ourselves.

We will plumb the depths and range of documentary expression with assigned materials that include thought pieces (reflections written by practitioners on process, context, dilemmas, and/or mistakes), reviews/critiques, as well actual documentaries. All assigned materials—readings and links to podcasts and videos—will be made available on Sakai.

We will begin our exploration by considering why documentary stories are important, what makes a compelling story, and how various media forms are employed by documentary artists. Subsequently, our discussions will address questions fundamental to any documentary form concerning issues such as point of view, representation, reciprocity, truth, editing, and ethics. Hands- on activities, interspersed throughout the semester, will allow students to engage with documentary forms and questions.

Students will propose, research, and carry-out a creative documentary project for the course, which will be work-shopped during class sessions. Possible outcomes could include a podcast, photo series, video piece, drawings, or narrative non-fiction essay.

Equipment is not provided, but students will be advised about a range of readily-available tools (smart phones and apps) and low or no-cost approaches that could be used. No previous experience or technical skills required; project formats are flexible.

The following are major pedagogical goals for the course:

  • Identify and address the complexities involved in representing others.
     
  • Contextualize documentary work historically and comparatively.
     
  • Understand the present-day call from BIPOC documentarians for accountability and culture shift in the documentary field
     
  • Learn about documentary studies at Duke University.
     
  • Engage with a variety of genres of documentary work.
     
  • Identify biases within—as well as voices and themes traditionally missing from—the documentary field.
     
  • Synthesize knowledge from readings, screenings, and speakers.
     
  • Reflect on how documentary practices inform and inspire social change.
     
  • Imagine new uses and forms of documentary work based on an understanding of the evolution of documentary forms.
     
  • Understand major ethical dilemmas involved in doing and exhibiting documentary work.
About Chris Sims
Sanford School of Public Policy / Center for Documentary Studies
Instructor:
Kent Wicker
770-02
Summer 1 Extended 2023
Wednesdays, 6-9 PM
GLS House, 2114 Campus Drive
Show Details

Click here to watch a course preview video.

Satire is all around us, from internet memes and fake websites to sketch comedy, political cartoons and movies.  Rewriting our social or political realities from a different angle can – if done well – be wickedly funny.  It is a real pleasure to see truths punctured and assumptions set askew.

In this class, we will explore what satire is and how it works.  This will include asking questions such as:

  • How does satire work in your personal value system?  Is anything beyond the pale?  Who and what are proper targets for satire?  
  • Satire can be seen as the “spoonful of sugar” that lowers our resistance to the “medicine” of social or political critique.  But in making that critique more palatable, does satire end up functioning as a sort of pressure release valve that undermines any real social change?
  • What is satire’s relationship to truth?  During the era of Trump, behaviors previously seen as deplorable have been normalized. How can satire compete with reality in an age of postmodern “truthiness”?

In this class we will try to answer such questions by exploring both classic (e.g. Dickens, Twain) and contemporary works of satire (e.g. Get Out, Parks & Rec, The Daily Show, SNL, Ask a Slave). Exactly how that works we will figure out as we go along.  A good deal of the course material will be student-generated, as students share and discuss their own favorite examples of satire – with the option of creating and sharing satire of your own as well.  

About Kent Wicker
Graduate Liberal Studies

Kent Wicker's academic interests include 1) issues of class, gender and region in American and post-colonial literatures; 2) narrative theory and the historical development of the novel; and 3) literary representation, realism, satire and fantasy.  He is also interested in embodiment, religious and intellectual history, and the history of everyday life.   With Donna Zapf, he created the GLS Core Course in interdisciplinary studies and now serves as assistant director of the GLS program.

LS 760 - 38
Fall 2021
Thursdays, 6-9 PM
GLS House, 2114 Campus Drive
Show Details

Watch a course preview video.  

Students will be introduced to strategies for conducting documentary fieldwork and archival research with a variety of tools and mediums, including photography, film/video, audio, narrative writing, and poetry. A major focus will be on identifying and analyzing the ethical and aesthetic considerations related to representing and exhibiting the lives and stories of others, and/or ourselves.

We will plumb the depths and range of documentary expression with assigned materials that include thought pieces (reflections written by practitioners on process, context, dilemmas, and/or mistakes), reviews/critiques, as well actual documentaries. All assigned materials—readings and links to podcasts and videos—will be made available on Sakai.

We will begin our exploration by considering why documentary stories are important, what makes a compelling story, and how various media forms are employed by documentary artists. Subsequently, our discussions will address questions fundamental to any documentary form concerning issues such as point of view, representation, reciprocity, truth, editing, and ethics. Hands- on activities, interspersed throughout the semester, will allow students to engage with documentary forms and questions.

Students will propose, research, and carry-out a creative documentary project for the course, which will be work-shopped during class sessions. Possible outcomes could include a podcast, photo series, video piece, drawings, or narrative non-fiction essay.

Equipment is not provided, but students will be advised about a range of readily-available tools (smart phones and apps) and low or no-cost approaches that could be used. No previous experience or technical skills required; project formats are flexible.

The following are major pedagogical goals for the course:

  • Identify and address the complexities involved in representing others.
     
  • Contextualize documentary work historically and comparatively.
     
  • Understand the present-day call from BIPOC documentarians for accountability and culture shift in the documentary field
     
  • Learn about documentary studies at Duke University.
     
  • Engage with a variety of genres of documentary work.
     
  • Identify biases within—as well as voices and themes traditionally missing from—the documentary field.
     
  • Synthesize knowledge from readings, screenings, and speakers.
     
  • Reflect on how documentary practices inform and inspire social change.
     
  • Imagine new uses and forms of documentary work based on an understanding of the evolution of documentary forms.
     
  • Understand major ethical dilemmas involved in doing and exhibiting documentary work.
LS 760-39
Fall 2021
Thursdays, 3-6 PM
GLS House, 2114 Campus Drive
Begins August 21 - Ends November 23
Show Details

Watch a course preview video.  

Students will be introduced to strategies for conducting documentary fieldwork and archival research with a variety of tools and mediums, including photography, film/video, audio, narrative writing, and poetry. A major focus will be on identifying and analyzing the ethical and aesthetic considerations related to representing and exhibiting the lives and stories of others, and/or ourselves.

We will plumb the depths and range of documentary expression with assigned materials that include thought pieces (reflections written by practitioners on process, context, dilemmas, and/or mistakes), reviews/critiques, as well actual documentaries. All assigned materials—readings and links to podcasts and videos—will be made available on Sakai.

We will begin our exploration by considering why documentary stories are important, what makes a compelling story, and how various media forms are employed by documentary artists. Subsequently, our discussions will address questions fundamental to any documentary form concerning issues such as point of view, representation, reciprocity, truth, editing, and ethics. Hands- on activities, interspersed throughout the semester, will allow students to engage with documentary forms and questions.

Students will propose, research, and carry-out a creative documentary project for the course, which will be work-shopped during class sessions. Possible outcomes could include a podcast, photo series, video piece, drawings, or narrative non-fiction essay.

Equipment is not provided, but students will be advised about a range of readily-available tools (smart phones and apps) and low or no-cost approaches that could be used. No previous experience or technical skills required; project formats are flexible.

The following are major pedagogical goals for the course:

  • Identify and address the complexities involved in representing others.
     
  • Contextualize documentary work historically and comparatively.
     
  • Understand the present-day call from BIPOC documentarians for accountability and culture shift in the documentary field
     
  • Learn about documentary studies at Duke University.
     
  • Engage with a variety of genres of documentary work.
     
  • Identify biases within—as well as voices and themes traditionally missing from—the documentary field.
     
  • Synthesize knowledge from readings, screenings, and speakers.
     
  • Reflect on how documentary practices inform and inspire social change.
     
  • Imagine new uses and forms of documentary work based on an understanding of the evolution of documentary forms.
     
  • Understand major ethical dilemmas involved in doing and exhibiting documentary work.
Instructor:
Thomas Brothers
LS 770-05
Fall 2021
Tuesdays, 6:15-8:45 pm
Mary Duke Biddle 069
Show Details

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This course explores musical experience according to three different dimensions: first, music as a social phenomenon, second as an emotional one, and finally as transcendental (aka ineffable, spiritual, sublime, holy). Examples are drawn from African-American music in New Orleans, popular music, jazz, Bach and Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and the Romantics, sacred music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, John Coltrane, and Gospel.

 

Each of us already has a sense of music as a social phenomenon.  We like a certain kind of music, in part, is because it helps define our peer group, social class, and self-identity as a rebellious person, a conformist, and so on.  All music is socially conceived, but some kinds of music invest heavily in this project.  Many genres of African-American music, for example, are designed to bring people together in a participatory way.  The inquiry extends to the use of music as a way to energize ideologies.

 

Most people are also aware of their own emotional experience of music, but it is possible to go further.  We have been taught how to articulate emotions in socialized ways, and this can be observed musically. Musical gestures correspond with feelings. This section of the course includes readings on emotions, neuroscience and music. 

 

It is challenging to talk about music as a transcendental phenomenon, but that does not invalidate the experience.  For the nineteenth-century Romantics, music was the queen of the arts because of its ability to transport listeners into ethereal realms.  African-American churches rely on music to do the same thing as they try to connect with the Holy Spirit.  We may separate the themes of social, emotional and transcendental for analytical purposes, but in the end they are closely connected. This is demonstrated by another African-American example: the participatory music-making of nineteenth-century slaves was primarily social at the same time that it was intensely emotional and also transcendental, the latter indicated by the name of the great body of music that emerged—the Spirituals.

About Thomas Brothers
Music

GLS Advisory Committee Term: 2019-2022

Thomas Brothers is Professor of Music.  He joined the faculty at Duke in 1991 after completing his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley.  He has published three books on Louis Armstrong, most recently Louis Armstrong, Master of Modernism (W.W. Norton, 2014).  In addition to African American music, Professor Brothers also teaches music of the medieval and renaissance periods. His most recent book, Help! The Beatles, Duke Ellington, and the Magic of Collaboration, was published in 2018.

Summer 2022
Study Away
Show Details

GLS Students may apply to one of four summer programs at Oxford for Duke credit. Applications may be submitted directly to the University of Oxford; upon admission to the summer program, GLS will issue a permission number to register for the course for Duke credit. Please email Lisa Robinson Bailey with any questions about registration and payment. 

Please note that all payments will be processed by GLS. Duke tuition and room and board at Oxford will be billed via the Duke Bursar according to the summer billing schedule. Program fees, accommodations, and application deadlines vary according to program.  

English Literature Summer School, Exeter College,  July 2-22, 2023 

  • Deadline to submit application: Applications will be processed on a first come, first served or rolling basis until May 1, 2023. Subject to the availability of places, late applications may be accepted until June 1, 2023.
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2545
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite: $2950

Complete course information and application for English Literature.

History, Politics and Society Summer School, Exeter College, July 2-22, 2023

  • Deadline to submit application: There are two gathered field deadlines: April 15, 2023, and May 1, 2023. Subject to the availability of places, late applications may be considered on a first come, first served basis until June 1, 2023.
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2545
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite: $2950

Complete course information and application for History, Politics & Society.

Creative Writing Summer School (Intermediate and Advanced programs), Exeter College, July 23-August 12, 2023

  • Deadline to submit application: 

    • Applications for the intermediate strand will be processed on a first come, first served or rolling basis until May 15, 2023. Subject to the availability of places, late applications may be accepted until June 15, 2023.
    • There are three gathered field deadlines for applications to the advanced strand of the program: March 1, April 15, and May 15. Subject to the availability of places, late applications may be considered on a first come, first served basis until June 15, 2023.
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2545
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite: $2950

Complete course information and application for Creative Writing

International Politics Summer School, St. Antony’s College, July 30-August 12, 2023

  • Deadline to submit application: There is a limited number of places available on every seminar, and in assigning successful applicants to seminar groups the Program Director will pay particular attention to applicants' personal statements. Subject to the availability of places, late applications may be considered until June 15, 2023.
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $1625
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite: $2181

Complete course information and application for International Politics.

Explanation of Tuition and Program Fees:

Duke tuition ($4290) and room and board at Oxford will be charged to your bursar account and is due according to summer tuition schedule.  Students wishing to make installment payment (Duke tuition portion ONLY), must be enrolled in the TMS plan. See www.bursar.duke.edu 

Program fees include access to Oxford’s IT facilities and the Continuing Education Library; accommodations, and meals (except lunch on Saturday and Sunday). You are responsible for your travel costs.

Cancellations conditions set forth by Oxford University:

All enrollments are subject to Oxford University Department for Continuing Education’s Terms and Conditions for Course Registration and Fee Payment. A contract between OUDCE and a student comes into being when an offer of a place on the summer school is made.

You have the right to cancel this contract at any time within 14 days, beginning on the day you received the offer, by declining the offer of a place. If you wish to cancel your place on the summer school you must inform the Oxford program administrator (Jacqueline Darvill) by email, as well as the GLS Office, dukegls@duke.edu.

Please be aware that if you cancel your place at any time after the expiry of the 14-day period you will not be entitled to a refund of the price paid for the summer school. Should you withdraw from the program after the 14-day cancellation period, you are responsible for the entire amount noted on Oxford’s website, payable in USD and at the exchange rate at the time of cancellation, to Duke University GLS.

You are expected to take out vacation cancellation insurance (to cover the total program fees and travel costs), and you should consult your travel agent and/or insurer for information and advice. Please note that Oxford University Department of Continuing Education does not provide any insurance coverage.

 

Instructor:
Amy Laura Hall
LS 770-01 (2488)
Summer 2021
Wednesdays, 5:00 - 8:00 pm EDT
Online
Show Details

Two comedic themes during the Pandemic of 2020 have been time and memory, and the discombobulation of both. In this seminar, we will read words and images recalling time, told in different forms. For publishing purposes, an item needs a “genre.” The items for this class may be convened under the genre “memoir,” in the form of essays, poems, drawings, and more conventional storytelling. Readings may include: James Baldwin’s Notes of a Native Son (1955); Lillian Smith’s Killers of the Dream (1949); Larry McMurtry’s In a Narrow Grave (1968); Audre Lorde’s The Cancer Journals (1980); Patricia Polacco’s My Rotten Redheaded Older Brother (1994); James McBride’s The Color of Water (1995); Jerry Stiller’s Married to Laughter (2000); Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home (2006); Roz Chast’s Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant (2014); and Miranda Richmond Mouillot’s A Fifty-Year Silence (2015). Weekly (2-3 pp. double-spacing, 10-11 point font) close reading from the assigned text. Papers due at time of class. Participation is 40% of your grade; papers, 60%. Listening attentively to your neighbor is as important as speech for your participation grade.

About Amy Laura Hall
Divinity School

GLS Advisory Committee Term: 2021-24

Amy Laura Hall is the author of four books: Kierkegaard and the Treachery of Love, Conceiving Parenthood: The Protestant Spirit of Biotechnological Reproduction, Writing Home with Love: Politics for Neighbors and Naysayers, and Laughing at the Devil: Seeing the World with Julian of Norwich. She has also written numerous scholarly articles in theological and biomedical ethics. Her new essay on Kierkegaard and love will appear in the T&T Clark Companion to the Theology of Kierkegaard (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2019). Her book Laughing at the Devil was chosen for the 2019 Virginia Festival of the Book and as a focus lecture for the Chautauqua Institution in June, 2019. She continues work on a longer research project on masculinity and gender anxiety in mainstream, white evangelicalism.

Professor Hall has served on the steering committee of the Genome Ethics, Law, and Policy Center, the Bioethics Task Force of the United Methodist Church, and as consultant on bioethics to the World Council of Churches. She has served on the steering committee of the Genome Ethics, Law, and Policy Center and as a faculty member for the Focus Program of the Institute on Genome Sciences and Policy. She served as a faculty adviser with the Duke Center for Civic Engagement and as a faculty advisor for the NCCU-Duke Program in African, African American & Diaspora Studies. She currently teaches with and serves on the faculty advisory board for Graduate Liberal Studies and serves as a core faculty member of the Focus Program in Global Health. Hall serves as an elder in the Rio Texas Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church.

Instructor:
Charles D Thompson
LS 780-28
Spring 2021
Thursdays, 7:00-9:30 PM
Online
Show Details

CLICK TO WATCH WATCH A COURSE PREVIEW 

Humanity is on the move.  Climate refugees, exiles of war, economic migrants, expatriates seeking new opportunities, along with others compelled to flee their current circumstances and look for a new life, are moving across borders comprise a chaotic movement en masse in greater numbers than ever in the history of humanity.  Combine these movers with the billions of religious pilgrims, adventure travelers, and tourists, and we find ourselves in a chaotic world of migrations in every direction.  How to make sense of it?  What does this world of travel tell us about our future?

In this course, we will seek to make sense of all the movements in which we find ourselves and others.  Readings on pilgrimage will intermingle with memoirs and essays on travel, writings and films on the act of walking, and readings and explorations of refugees, immigrant life, and border crossings.  We will seek to understand this means for humanity and for us personally.

We will place ourselves in this mix of movers as we consider our impact on the world.  We will consider related questions, such as: How should we think of places and identities in a world in motion?  Are there ethical means of travel in this age of climate change and political upheaval?  How does travel and an act as simple as an afternoon walk resemble the pattern of a human life?  How does a labyrinth give us a glimpse into the meaning of movement in larger contexts?  What can pilgrimage mean for non-traditional participants on a religious journey? How do we make sense of our place in a world where refugees are knocking at our door asking to be let in to American safety?  What of border walls and their meaning for our collective human future?  And more!

We will explore such readings as:

  • Ian Reader’s Pilgrimage: A Very Short Introduction
  • Selection from three books by Rebecca Solnit: A Book of Migrations, A Field Guide to Getting Lost and Wanderlust
  • Henry David Thoreau’s Walking
  • Frederic Gros’s: A Philosophy of Walking
  • Duncan Minshall’s While Wandering: A Walking Companion
  • Suketo Mehta’s This Land is Our Land: An Immigrant’s Manifesto
  • John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath
  • Sonia Nozario’s Enrique’s Journey
  • John F. Kennedy’s A Nation of Immigrants
  • Annie Dillard’s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek
  • Timothy Egan’s A Pilgrimage to Eternity
  • Gloria Anzaldua’s Borderlands/La Frontera
  • Valeria Luiselli’s  Lost Children Archive
  • Charles Thompson’s Border Odyssey: Travels Along the US/Mexico Divide
  • And more.

In addition to readings, we will watch and discuss such films such as Estevez’s The Way, Herzog’s Pilgrimage, Apted’s 63 Up, and the classic, Wizard of Oz, among others.  

This course should appeal to anyone interested in current affairs, especially those reflecting on the meaning of life, whether backwards or forwards; those considering the meanings and ramifications of travel; global citizens hoping to live ethically in a world of the displaced; humanists concerned about climate change and movement; and generally anyone who has ever walked and, with Thoreau, wanted to reflect on what it means “to saunter.” Hint: the root word signifies walking is a holy undertaking.

Seminar format.  Participation mandatory.  Applied studies of pilgrimages, work with immigrants, and travel encouraged.  No prerequisites.  Meant to appeal to all GLS students.


The development and initial offering of this new course in the Spring of 2021 was supported through the generosity of GLS alumna Lottie Applewhite.


Charles D. Thompson, Jr. is Professor of the Practice of Cultural Anthropology and Documentary Studies at Duke University. A common thread through his work is a deep concern for people doing their all to have a voice in our agricultural systems.

Thompson holds a Ph.D. in religion and culture from UNC-Chapel Hill, with concentrations in cultural studies and Latin American studies. He also holds an M.S. degree in Agricultural Education from NC A&T State University. His particular interests include farmworkers, immigration, agriculture, and Appalachian Studies. His methodology includes oral history, ethnographic writing, documentary filmmaking, and collaborative community activism.

A former farmer, Thompson remains concerned about laborers within our food system. He has written and made films about small farmers and farmworkers. He is an advisory board member of Student Action with Farmworkers, the Duke Campus Farm, and other food and agricultural initiatives.

Thompson is author or editor of six books. His latest (2015) is, Border Odyssey: Traveling the Valley of the Shadow of Death. He also wrote Spirits of Just Men: Mountaineers, Liquor Bosses, and Lawmen in the Moonshine Capital of the World. He is also editor, with Melinda Wiggins, of The Human Cost of Food: Farmworker Lives, Labor, and Advocacy.

Thompson is the producer/director of five documentary films, including Faces of Time (2015), Brother Towns/ Pueblos Hermanos (2010), We Shall Not Be Moved (2008), and The Guestworker (2007). His latest film, in collaboration with the organization, Farm Aid, is entitled, Homeplace Under Fire (2016).

About Charles D Thompson
Cultural Anthropology

GLS Advisory Committee Term: 2022-2025

Charles D. Thompson, Jr. is Professor of the Practice of Cultural Anthropology and Documentary Studies at Duke University, and Senior Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics. He holds a Ph.D. in religion and culture from UNC-Chapel Hill, with concentrations in cultural studies and Latin American studies. He also holds an M.S. degree in Agricultural Education from NC A&T State University. A former farmer, Thompson remains concerned about issues affecting laborers within our food system. He has written about farmworkers, and he is an advisory board member of Student Action with Farmworkers, the Duke Campus Farm, and other Duke food and agriculture initiatives. 

Thompson is author or editor of seven books, including Going Over Home: A Search for Rural Justice in an Unsettled Land, Border Odyssey: Traveling the US/Mexico Divide (2015), Spirits of Just Men: Mountaineers, Liquor Bosses, and Lawmen in the Moonshine Capital of the World, and, with Melinda Wiggins, The Human Cost of Food: Farmworker Lives, Labor, and Advocacy. He is also the producer/director of seven documentary films, including Rock Castle Home,  Homeplace Under Fire, Border Crossing 101, Faces of Time, Brother Towns/ Pueblos Hermanos (2010), We Shall Not Be Moved (2008), and The Guestworker (2007). His current work includes a project hosted by Kenan Institute for Ethics entitled, “America’s Hallowed Ground.”

Instructor:
Robert Healy
LS 760-39
Spring 2022
Tuesdays, 6-9 PM
GLS House, 2114 Campus Drive
Show Details

CLICK HERE TO WATCH A COURSE PREVIEW VIDEO 

The earth now has 7.8 million people and will likely peak at 10 billion around 2060.  How can the diversity of plants, animals and ecosystems survive on a finite planet with a climate that is changing at an unprecedented rate?  This course examines the role of national parks and other protected areas and the challenges these areas face in protecting species and ecosystems.  It is notable that the acreage of protected areas is higher than ever, and substantially above the 10 percent that was once the target of the environmental movement.  Yet global extinctions are high and rising.  Two of the main issues for protected areas are dealing with a fast-growing flood of tourists and making peace with the hundreds of millions of people, many of them poor, who live in and around them.  Is conflict among protected areas, local populations and tourism inevitable?  Or can we make tourism “sustainable” and harness it for the benefit of both nature protection and local development?The earth now has 7.8 million people and will likely peak at 10 billion around 2060.  How can the diversity of plants, animals and ecosystems survive on a finite planet with a climate that is changing at an unprecedented rate?  This course examines the role of national parks and other protected areas and the challenges these areas face in protecting species and ecosystems.  It is notable that the acreage of protected areas is higher than ever, and substantially above the 10 percent that was once the target of the environmental movement.  Yet global extinctions are high and rising.  Two of the main issues for protected areas are dealing with a fast-growing flood of tourists and making peace with the hundreds of millions of people, many of them poor, who live in and around them.  Is conflict among protected areas, local populations and tourism inevitable?  Or can we make tourism “sustainable” and harness it for the benefit of both nature protection and local development?

About Robert Healy
Nicholas School of the Environment

Bob Healy is Professor Emeritus of Environmental Policy in the Nicholas School and of Public Policy Studies in the Terry Sanford School. Before coming to Duke in 1986, he was a researcher with The Urban Institute, Resources for the Future and The Conservation Foundation/World Wildlife Fund in Washington, D.C. He has written ten books, mainly on issues of land use, environmental management and economic development. The latest are Knowledge and Environmental Policy (MIT 2011) and Environmental Policy in North America (Toronto 2013). Locally, he has long been involved with efforts to protect the New Hope Creek watershed. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California at Los Angeles.

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