Study Away

Study international politics at Oxford. Lose yourself in the London arts scene. Explore the biodiversity of North Carolina's highlands. GLS offers opportunities for immersive learning outside the classroom at home and abroad.

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Graduate Liberal Studies offers study abroad opportunities in the summer term and similar opportunities in the United States (study away) throughout the year. These include both GLS seminars taught by Duke graduate faculty and courses within the Oxford University International Summer Schools. Course dates and information are available in fall for the following summer.

GLS study abroad seminars are designed to accommodate the busy schedules of GLS students. A typical course combines on-campus meetings with a two-week session in the country of study. Term papers and final requirements are often completed upon return.

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The 2016 Biodiversity of North Carolina class visits the Highlands Biological
Station in the mountains of western NC.

Recent GLS study abroad courses include:

  • Rome: the City and Her Gods
  • Art and Architecture in the Age of Dante in Florence
  • Cathedrals and Cities in France
  • Classical Theater and its Architecture in Greece
  • The Arts in London
  • Art Markets: A Perspective on Netherlandish Art and Visual Culture
  • Kings, Emperors and Castles in Naples and Sicily
  • Art and Politics in Renaissance Florence

Oxford University’s International Summer Schools offer intensive, graduate-level courses. Over a three-week period, students attend daily lectures followed by small group seminars comprising students from across the globe. Options include English Literature; History, Politics and Society; Creative Writing; and International Politics. 

Recent GLS courses that have included study away opportunities in the United States include Biodiversity in North Carolina, which involved field research in the North Carolina mountains, and Louis Armstong's New Orleans, which offered students the opportunity to work in New Orleans musical and historical archives.

Upcoming study away courses

Summer 2017
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GLS Students may apply to one of four summer programs at Oxford for Duke credit. Duke tuition of $3945 will be billed via the bursar according to the summer billing schedule. Program fees, accommodations, and application deadlines vary according to program. All application materials and payment for program fees must be submitted to GLS, not Oxford. Director Donna Zapf will provide letters of reference. Questions should be directed to Lisa Robinson Bailey (llrb@duke.edu). Please note that the International Politics Summer School is two-week course; all other courses are three weeks.

English Literature Summer School, Exeter College, July 2-22

  • Deadline to submit application to GLS: February 1, 2017
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2300
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite (limited availability): $2700
  • Non-refundable deposit due by application deadline: $500

Complete course information and application: https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/english-literature-summer-school-2017

History, Politics and Society Summer School, Exeter College, July 2-22

  • Deadline to submit application to GLS: February 1, 2017
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2300
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite (limited availability): $2700
  • Non-refundable deposit due by application deadline: $500

Complete course information and application: https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/history-politics-society-summer-scho...

Creative Writing Summer School, Exeter College, July 23-August 12

  • Deadline to submit application to GLS: February 15, 2017
  • Program fees/room and board, shared facilities: $2300
  • Program fees/room and board, en suite (limited availability): $2700
  • Non-refundable deposit due by application deadline: $500

Note: Creative writing courses are offered at two levels. Level 1 courses are suitable for applicants who have completed one year of a full-time university degree course in creative writing or English literature. Level 2 is suitable for applicants who have completed two years of a full-time university degree course in creative writing or English literature. Please note that the summer school is not appropriate for those who have already achieved publication. You will need to submit samples of your work samples of your work which demonstrate your powers of creative expression. See the Oxford International Summer Schools website for specific guidelines for submitting you writing samples: https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/creative-writing-summer-school-2017

International Politics Summer School, St. Antony’s College, July 30-August 12

  • Deadline to submit application to GLS: February 15, 2017
  • Room and board, en suite: $1950*
  • Room and board, shared facilities: $1550
  • Non-refundable deposit due by application deadline: $500

*At St. Antony’s College, students normally will have a single study bedroom with private bathroom facilities; a limited number of standard rooms with shared bathroom facilities is also available for a reduced fee as listed above.

Complete course information and application: https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/international-politics-summer-school...

Explanation of Tuition and Program Fees:

Duke Tuition - $3945. Tuition will be charged to your bursar account and is due according to summer tuition schedule. This is the only part of the cost covered by GLS scholarship. Students wishing to make installment payment (Duke tuition portion ONLY), must be enrolled in the TMS plan. See www.bursar.duke.edu 

Program fees include access to Oxford’s IT facilities and the Continuing Education Library; accommodations, and meals (except lunch on Saturday and Sunday). You are responsible for your travel costs.

Applications must be received in the GLS office by the deadline noted above for each program. A non-refundable advance deposit of $500 is due by February 15 and may be paid to your bursar account via e-check (please select the "Nonrefundable Advance Deposit" option and specify that your advance deposit be applied against the summer 1 term). The balance will be billed with tuition via the bursar in mid-April and is due by May 12.

Cancellations:

All enrolments are subject to Oxford University Department for Continuing Education’s Terms and Conditions for Course Registration and Fee Payment. A contract between OUDCE and a student comes into being when an offer of a place on the summer school is made.

You have the right to cancel this contract at any time within 14 days, beginning on the day you received the offer, by declining the offer of a place. If you wish to cancel your place on the summer school you must inform the Oxford program administrator (Jacqueline Darvill) by email, as well as the GLS Office, dukegls@duke.edu.

Please be aware that if you cancel your place at any time after the expiry of the 14-day period you will not be entitled to a refund of the price paid for the summer school. Should you withdraw from the program after the 14-day cancellation period, you are responsible for the entire amount noted on Oxford’s website, payable in USD and at the exchange rate at the time of cancellation, to Duke University GLS.

You are expected to take out vacation cancellation insurance (to cover the total program fees and travel costs), and you should consult your travel agent and/or insurer for information and advice. Please note that Oxford University Department of Continuing Education does not provide any insurance coverage.

 

Instructor:
Jonathan Shaw
Paul Manos
LS 760-24
Spring 2018
Tuesdays, 6:15 - 8:45 PM
Biological Sciences 130
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NOTE:  This course has a 4-day study-away component and an extra $275 which will be charged on your bursar account.

North Carolina is a hotspot for biodiversity because of the rich variety of habitats and because the state was not covered by glaciers during the recent ice ages.  This course will examine biodiversity in the southern Appalachian mountains of western North Carolina.  We will have eight on-campus class meetings during the semester and then spend four (glorious) days at the beautiful Highlands Biological Station (tentative dates - April 4-8), which is situated in one of the richest areas of the southern Appalachians.  On campus we will discuss themes related to evolution, biogeography, and conservation while reading selected papers and David Quammen’s 1996 book, The Song of the Dodo: Island Biogeography in an Age of Extinctions.

In the mountains we will visit natural habitats ranging from the protected cove forests along the Blue Ridge to subalpine Spruce-Fir forests.  During field trips, we will emphasize basic plant biology and ecology.  We also will closely examine plants that we collect during our field trips.  Lectures/discussions will present themes related to land use history in North Carolina, conservation of mountain biodiversity, and the ecology of natural ecosystems.

This course does not require an academic background in biology; enthusiasm for nature and spending some time outdoors will suffice!  Moderate to challenging hikes (please contact the professors for details) will be included with an emphasis on hands-on experiences identifying plants and observing natural plant communities.

We require students to lead discussions in class, to write a term paper, and to keep a journal during the field trip that would include both scientific observations, e.g., ecological notes and species observed, and impressions.

About Jonathan Shaw
Biology

Jonathan Shaw is a Professor in the Department of Biology. He received his Ph.D. in 1983 from the University of Michigan. Dr. Shaw's research is on the systematics, population genetics, and evolution of bryophytes (mosses). Some of his research interests have included the taxonomy and classification of particular groups of mosses, developmental anatomy, and genetic relationships among populations of very rare species. A current focus in the lab is the evolution of peatmosses (Sphagnum) and Dr. Shaw's field work tends to be in polar and high altitude environments. He has published some 200 scientific papers and has edited two books, one on the evolution of tolerance in plants to toxic metals in the environment, and one on the biology of bryophytes. Dr. Shaw taught for eight years at a liberal arts college (Ithaca College) before coming to Duke in 1996.

,
About Paul Manos
Biology

Paul Manos is a Professor in the Department of Biology.  He received his Ph.D. in 1993 from Cornell University.  Dr. Manos’s research is on the systematics and biogeography of the flowering plants.  His main research interest is the evolution of the oaks and their relatives, the hickories and walnuts.  He has published some 40 scientific papers spanning many different families of flowering plants, often with an emphasis on geography.  Dr. Manos has taught several plant biodiversity courses since coming to Duke in 1996.

Instructor:
Jonathan Shaw
Paul Manos
LS 760-24
Spring 2018
Tuesdays, 6:15 - 8:45 PM
Biological Sciences 130
Show Details

NOTE:  This course has a 4-day study-away component and an extra $275 which will be charged on your bursar account.

North Carolina is a hotspot for biodiversity because of the rich variety of habitats and because the state was not covered by glaciers during the recent ice ages.  This course will examine biodiversity in the southern Appalachian mountains of western North Carolina.  We will have eight on-campus class meetings during the semester and then spend four (glorious) days at the beautiful Highlands Biological Station (tentative dates - April 4-8), which is situated in one of the richest areas of the southern Appalachians.  On campus we will discuss themes related to evolution, biogeography, and conservation while reading selected papers and David Quammen’s 1996 book, The Song of the Dodo: Island Biogeography in an Age of Extinctions.

In the mountains we will visit natural habitats ranging from the protected cove forests along the Blue Ridge to subalpine Spruce-Fir forests.  During field trips, we will emphasize basic plant biology and ecology.  We also will closely examine plants that we collect during our field trips.  Lectures/discussions will present themes related to land use history in North Carolina, conservation of mountain biodiversity, and the ecology of natural ecosystems.

This course does not require an academic background in biology; enthusiasm for nature and spending some time outdoors will suffice!  Moderate to challenging hikes (please contact the professors for details) will be included with an emphasis on hands-on experiences identifying plants and observing natural plant communities.

We require students to lead discussions in class, to write a term paper, and to keep a journal during the field trip that would include both scientific observations, e.g., ecological notes and species observed, and impressions.

About Jonathan Shaw
Biology

Jonathan Shaw is a Professor in the Department of Biology. He received his Ph.D. in 1983 from the University of Michigan. Dr. Shaw's research is on the systematics, population genetics, and evolution of bryophytes (mosses). Some of his research interests have included the taxonomy and classification of particular groups of mosses, developmental anatomy, and genetic relationships among populations of very rare species. A current focus in the lab is the evolution of peatmosses (Sphagnum) and Dr. Shaw's field work tends to be in polar and high altitude environments. He has published some 200 scientific papers and has edited two books, one on the evolution of tolerance in plants to toxic metals in the environment, and one on the biology of bryophytes. Dr. Shaw taught for eight years at a liberal arts college (Ithaca College) before coming to Duke in 1996.

,
About Paul Manos
Biology

Paul Manos is a Professor in the Department of Biology.  He received his Ph.D. in 1993 from Cornell University.  Dr. Manos’s research is on the systematics and biogeography of the flowering plants.  His main research interest is the evolution of the oaks and their relatives, the hickories and walnuts.  He has published some 40 scientific papers spanning many different families of flowering plants, often with an emphasis on geography.  Dr. Manos has taught several plant biodiversity courses since coming to Duke in 1996.